GL1200 GOLDWINGS

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when testing the ignition coils, i'm getting over 12 volts on the black and white wires that plug into the negative blade of the ignition coils, while getting alot less voltage on the Y/B and B/Y which is plugged into the posstive blade on coil. is that correct
I don't know if those values are correct or not, but they sound correct. Let me explain:

The way a spark is allowed to jump a gap depends on the size of the magnetic field and how quickly that field collapses. There are other factors, but these are the main players.
First the field must be built up, this is done with the 12V and maybe 25 or 30 amps coming into the coils. The devices called pulse generators will cause this magnetic field to collapse. As the field collapses, it crosses over the secondary windings, generating a ton of voltage with very little current. It is this high voltage which is needed to jump the gap at the spark plug, thus creating a spark.
The coils need a power source (12V) and a triggering source (the pulse generators (low voltage))
A great way to 'play' with this idea is with the old point and condensor ignition system. In this system, the voltage and current pass through the points on their way to the coils. The magnetic field builds up until the points open, at which point the field collapses, generating a very high voltage, creating a spark as it jumps the plugs gap.
Tools needed to play are a point and condensor system, a compass and a non-conductive probe you will use to manually open the points.
With the system off, run the compass around the area of the coil and note the needle deflection.
Now charge the coils with the points closed and float the compass around the coil again. You will see a big difference in the needles deflection.
Set the compass down and use the non-conductive probe to manually open the points, the spark plug will make a 'snap' or 'crack' sound as the voltage jumps the gap, creating a spark.
I think this is fun stuff.
Imagine what the system must do to achieve 60 mph!

i hope this answered your question, if in fact, you still have a question, given the age of the original post.